Abolishing the Electoral College - Term Paper - Athrun1029

If skewed percentages were the only problem, the effort to abolish the Electoral College through a constitutional amendment wouldn't be worth the trouble.

[…] Arguments For Abolishing the Electoral College | Taylor Marsh Go to this article […]

Here is my argument in a nutshell: The states whose voting power is diminished in the electoral college are the highly partisan states, i.e. those that vote overwhelmingly for one candidate over another, regardless of size. In other words, the small, highly partisan states should want to abolish the electoral college, yet they are the ones who have most resisted its abolition.

3quarksdaily: How to Abolish the Electoral College (Really!)

Abolishing the electoral college and electing the 'President' directly is essential if these fatal flaws are to be addressed. Here is my argument in a nutshell: The states whose voting power is diminished in the electoral college are the highly partisan states, i.e. those that vote overwhelmingly for one candidate over another, regardless of size. In other words, the small, highly partisan states should want to abolish the electoral college, yet they are the ones who have most resisted its abolition.

abolish the electoral college system? | Yahoo Answers

Here is my argument in a nutshell: The states whose voting power is diminished in the electoral college are the highly partisan states, i.e. those that vote overwhelmingly for one candidate over another, regardless of size. In other words, the small, highly partisan states should want to abolish the electoral college, yet they are the ones who have most resisted its abolition.

January 22, 2008 Abolishing the Electoral College


Opponents of the Electoral College system also point to the risk of so-called "faithless" Electors. A "faithless Elector" is one who is pledged to vote for his party's candidate for president but nevertheless votes of another candidate. There have been 7 such Electors in this century and as recently as 1988 when a Democrat Elector in the State of West Virginia cast his votes for Lloyd Bensen for president and Michael Dukakis for vice president instead of the other way around. Faithless Electors have never changed the outcome of an election, though, simply because most often their purpose is to make a statement rather than make a difference. That is to say, when the electoral vote outcome is so obviously going to be for one candidate or the other, an occasional Elector casts a vote for some personal favorite knowing full well that it will not make a difference in the result. Still, if the prospect of a faithless Elector is so fearsome as to warrant a Constitutional amendment, then it is possible to solve the problem without abolishing the Electoral College merely by eliminating the individual Electors in favor of a purely mathematical process (since the individual Electors are no longer essential to its operation). In the meanwhile, the small states need to reassess their calculations of where their true strength lies. Utah's five electoral votes will never matter as much in the electoral college as its extreme partisan voting pattern would affect a nationwide popular vote. The same goes for the other states in the charts above. The sooner we can show them the math, the sooner we will be able to abolish the electoral college.