Different Types of Market Structure

This course disentangles the complex linkages and relationships between innovation dynamics, market structure and technological transfer from universities and research centres. The course is divided in four parts: the first one studies how different types of market structure obstacle or favour innovation adoption; the second one is more focus on Knowledge diffusion and interlink ages between the industrial world and the University; the third one studies how innovation dynamics influence and modify firms behaviour, industrial structure and the relationship between firms and the territory. Finally, a last part provides real world applications taken from the energy sector and recent environmental innovation studies.

The report shows that different types of market structure have developed over the last decade

This course disentangles the complex linkages and relationships between innovation dynamics, market structure and the environment. The first module of the course studies how different types of market structure obstacle or favour innovation adoption, with a special focus on eco-innovation. The second module of the course will be more related to the economic effect of eco-innovation in terms of firm’s performances and employment dynamics. Finally, the effect of Eco-Innovation on the environment will be shortly revised in the final module of the course. Several seminar lectures will provide real world applications taken from the energy sector and from recent innovation studies.

Different types of market structure

prices and distribution of product under different types of market structure Joe Saluzzi: Well I think obviously the first thing is making sure you're staying up on what's going on. There's a lot out there, there's a ton of information – we try to filter it out, we run our own little blog where we post a lot of stuff – but you've got to be knowledgeable about all these different types of market structure changes. You have to understand that there are thirteen exchanges and forty dark pools that kind of intermingle right now. But if you're an investor – do your homework, and if you like a stock, go ahead and buy. If you do your homework and your own research and if you feel it's a fairly valued company, well, am I going to tell you not to buy it? No. But don't follow the momo train – the momentum train thinking "I'm going to get on board this stock because it went from 100 to 130, I'm going to make some points here." Because as we've seen in the last few days particularly, when momentum stops, it just stops and it just gets crushed. Look at some of these stocks like CRE and F5 and Coinstar just over the past few days that have been destroyed, because that's momentum. Those aren't real investors, those are just quick flip artists. If you get caught in that game, you're going to get hurt, and there's no doubt about it. But if you're a long term guy and you like XYZ stock, well I'm not going to say not to buy it, but you still have to be aware in the back of your mind that this is an equity market that has changed, it's no longer the centrally driven auction place like it used to be, it's a fragmented market where there are different competing players with their own financial interest at heart that are not necessarily out for your best interest. So look out for yourself and do your own homework.

different types of market structure changes

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in the business context.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of relative prices and the distribution of resources and product under different types of market structures and firm behaviour.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify and describe the core concepts and theories of microeconomics, such as demand, supply and prices.
Explain economic models and their assumptions.
Critically evaluate economics related scenarios reported in the media and assess the impact such scenarios can have on everyday life.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

statics exercise with different types of market structure