Japanese fighting dog to be destroyed after ..

« Kumiko Motokis’s White Fang was for me perhaps the most exciting book dummy submitted to this year’s Kassel Fotobookfestival. Based on an actual dog fight that took place in Aomori in Northern Japan in early 2014, this slim soft-cover publication moves cleverly between colour and black-and-white imagery: colour for the build-up before the event; black and white for the fight scenes; colour for the brutal outcome. Varying between formal, straight-up portraiture, and Antoine D’Agataesque blurred imagery, along with well-placed inserts on the history of dog fighting in Japan — which is only banned in some areas across the country — this book perfectly manages to walk the fine line between the gruesomeness of this ancient and brutal practice and the well-crafted aesthetic of a modern-day photo book. » – Curt Holtz, Prestel Publishing

Stevens sold, they added, showed dog fighting in Japan, where they said the practice was legal

Answer: The agility, power, stamina, and tenacity of the Shikoku Ken made them highly desireable to own in the late 19th and early 20th century---a time period in Japan where dog fighting was popular. These characteristics combined with the popularity of dog fighting led the Shikoku Ken to contribute to the development of the Tosa Inu, or Tosa Fighting Dog; however, the Shikoku Ken is ** a fighting dog, they are a hunting dog. The fact that the Shikoku was an ingredient in a breed created for fighting does not make them a fighting breed. Cake is made using butter, but that doesn't mean that butter is a type of cake. Further, dog fighting in Japan, known as Token, does not reward vicous or dangerous behavior like dog fighting in North America. In Token, the fight ends if a dog barks, yelps, looses the will to continue, or if a doctor judges continuing to be a potential danger to a participant's health. Thus, the weak link that the Shikoku has to dog fighting is completely unrelated to the vicous and illegal fighting that is unfortunately too common in North America. We will reiterate, because this point is very important, the Shikoku is ** a fighting dog.

Fighting dog Tosa-inu. Yokozuna Tosa-inu. - YouTube

Further, dog fighting in Japan, known as Token, does not reward vicous or dangerous behavior like dog fighting in North America Kumiko Motokis’s was for me perhaps the most exciting book dummy submitted to this year’s Kassel Fotobookfestival. Based on an actual dog fight that took place in Aomori in Northern Japan in early 2014, this slim soft-cover publication moves cleverly between colour and black-and-white imagery: colour for the build-up before the event; black and white for the fight scenes; colour for the brutal outcome. Varying between formal, straight-up portraiture, and Antoine D’Agataesque blurred imagery, along with well-placed inserts on the history of dog fighting in Japan — which is only banned in some areas across the country — this book perfectly manages to walk the fine line between the gruesomeness of this ancient and brutal practice and the well-crafted aesthetic of a modern-day photo book.

Presentation ot Yokozuna Tosa-inu, fighting japanese dog.

The Akita Inu originated in the northernmost area of mainland Japan in the Tohoku region. This region sits just below the Hokkaido islands and comprises six prefectures; they are: Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima, Yamagata and of course Akita. The Akita prefecture city of Odate in the Tohoku District is recognized as the ancestral home of the Akita Inu, although it is not known when these dogs transitioned from wild to domesticated. Odate would later evolve into the epicenter of competitive dog fighting in Japan picking up the name "dog town" during the late 1880's.

The Japanese Fighting Dog - iBuzzle