7.1 Order Lifecycle Management Overview

By identifying and then reducing the purchase order lifecycle, retailers can significantly impact their organizations overall performance. Financial benefits a retailer can expect to receive include a reduction in overall working capital, a reduction in DC expenses and inventory carrying costs and a increase in return on invested capital (ROIC). An improvement in each of those key areas will put a smile on any CFO’s face. For the supply chain professional looking to be viewed less as a cost center and more of a margin contributor, this is an excellent place to start.

The order lifecycle management process integration enables the following business flows:

The process integration for order lifecycle management (OLM) is at the core of business and operational support systems for any communications service provider (CSP). The process extends from the time a quote or order is created to the time when the goods and services are delivered and properly billed.

Siebel Quote and Order Lifecycle Management - Oracle

For a sample of a purchase order lifecycle report drop me a line at: This chapter provides an overview of the Order Lifecycle Management (OLM) integration process, discusses a typical topology and order capture flow. It describes both the Deliver and Qualify customer order subflows, and also design considerations for product definition and mapping.

Siebel Quote and Order Lifecycle Management

Oracle's Siebel Quote and Order Lifecycle Management applications enable organizations to create, validate, and manage quotes and orders across the entire order lifecycle. They support complex pricing and product configuration, quote approval, availability checking, and credit and payment verification, ultimately ensuring that orders are complete, valid, and accurate before they are delivered to the customer.

Order Lifecycle Management - Innovative Retail Technologies


This chapter provides an overview of the Order Lifecycle Management (OLM) integration process, discusses a typical topology and order capture flow. It describes both the Deliver and Qualify customer order subflows, and also design considerations for product definition and mapping.First, what is the purchase order lifecycle? Chronologically speaking, it is the amount of time it takes a retailer to create and receive a purchase order. While the calculation appears simple, the ramifications are enormous from not only an operational perspective, but a financial one as well. The purchase order lifecycle isn’t just a calculation; it’s a book that tells the story and paints a picture of your supply chain’s performance. And contained within this book are individual chapters, individual steps along your supply chain path that reveal not only areas of excellence, but more importantly, areas of opportunity for the supply chain professional.

The process integration for order lifecycle management (OLM) is at the core of business and operational support systems for any communications service provider (CSP). The process extends from the time a quote or order is created to the time when the goods and services are delivered and properly billed.A key concept to understand is that the order lifecycle is independent of the business process that manipulates it. The same oder lifecycle should be valid for a high-frequency trading process, a retail investor process or a private banking process. In a high frequency trading context, some transition might have different guard conditions (for instance the transition from prepared to submitted is likely to be automatic. For private banking customers, the "funded" state might be reached before the funds are actually deposited in the brokerage account, and the "fund" operation might ensure that other securities will be sold to make the funds available before the settlement date. The bottom line is that a business entity lifecycle represents some business logic that is "business process independent". This is probably news to many of you and some of you might say that a BEL is a "long running process" but it is not. It is long running. It is a process in the sense of an operating system point of view (nearly), but it is not and will never be a "business process". The business process is represented by the activities (human or automated) that advance the lifecycle of one or more business entities.