View Richard Hackman’s professional profile on LinkedIn

[…] woke up this morning to the sad news that Prof. J. Richard Hackman has passed away. He was an unmissable presence at the Harvard Psychology Department, and I am […]

I first ran across J. Richard Hackman and his work on teams  from HBR.

J. Richard Hackman, Harvard University Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology, died on January 8, 2013. He was 72. Richard was a pioneer in the field of teams. His work was one of a few that profoundly shaped my outlook on and work with organizations.

J. Richard Hackman - Harvard University

J. Richard Hackman J. Richard Hackman (b1940- ) is an American organizational psychologist who is Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at . He has worked extensively in the field of and

Richard Hackman (@richhackman) | Twitter

I have been teaching educational leadership courses for twenty years. I was deeply saddend when I learned that Richard Hackman had passed away. His research on groups and teams influenced my thinking about teams for many years and it continues to enrich the seminars that I teach on the team building process. The doctoral studnts who had the good fortune to work with him were very lucky. His contributions to our understanding of what makes teams effective were immense and I celebrate the outstanding contributions this fine scholar made to the field of leadership stUdies. A. E. Ted Wall

Richard Hackman Page and shop for all J


Richard Hackman is the Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at Harvard University. He received his undergraduate degree in mathematics in 1962 and his doctorate in social psychology from the University of Illinois in 1966. He taught at Yale until 1986, when he moved to Harvard.J. Richard Hackman, one of the world’s leading experts on group behavior, argues that the answer to this puzzle is rooted in flawed thinking about team leadership. It is not a leader’s management style that determines how well a team performs, but how well a leader designs and supports a team so that members can manage themselves.J. Richard Hackman spent nearly a half century exploring the dynamics of teamwork and effective leadership, leaving an indelible mark on the field of organizational psychology. Hackman, a 2013 APS James McKeen Cattell Fellow, passed away in January, and a few of his former students and collaborators gathered at the 25th APS Annual Convention to honor his legacy.I have been teaching educational leadership courses for twenty years. I was deeply saddend when I learned that Richard Hackman had passed away. His research on groups and teams influenced my thinking about teams for many years and it continues to enrich the seminars that I teach on the team building process. The doctoral studnts who had the good fortune to work with him were very lucky. His contributions to our understanding of what makes teams effective were immense and I celebrate the outstanding contributions this fine scholar made to the field of leadership stUdies. A. E. Ted Wall